New Books in the Library

Come check out the new items that have just arrived in the OCCC Library!

100 artists of the Northwest

by E. Ashley Rooney

The works of 100 contemporary artists interpret and provide a fresh look at the artistic vibrancy of the Northwest region of the United States. The states of Oregon and Washington are rich with artists, having become vital art scenes in the past several decades. Using sculpture, glass, oil, clay, wood, and other contemporary mediums, as well as paint, these 21st century artists combine, redesign, and transform their materials into pieces of works that change the way we perceive both the regions of the Northwest and the world. With a guide to galleries, sculpture parks, museums, and schools, this book is a wonderful resource for lovers of all art mediums.

Call No.: 709.797 ROONEY

12 years a slave

by Solomon Northrup

Perhaps the best written of all the slave narratives, Twelve Years a Slave is a harrowing memoir about one of the darkest periods in American history. It recounts how Solomon Northup, born a free man in New York, was lured to Washington, D.C., in 1841 with the promise of fast money, then drugged and beaten and sold into slavery. He spent the next twelve years of his life in captivity on a Louisiana cotton plantation. After his rescue, Northup published this exceptionally vivid and detailed account of slave life. It became an immediate bestseller and today is recognized for its unusual insight and eloquence as one of the very few portraits of American.--Page [4] of cover.

Call No.: 306.362 NORTHUP

Animal wise   

by Virginia Morrell

This book explores the frontiers of research on animal cognition and emotion, offering a surprising examination into the hearts and minds of wild and domesticated animals. Have you ever wondered what it is like to be a fish? Or a parrot, dolphin, or an elephant? Do they experience thoughts that are similar to ours, or have feelings of grief and love? These are tough questions, but scientists are answering them. They know that ants teach and rats love to be tickled. They have discovered that dogs have thousand-word vocabularies and that birds practice their songs in their sleep. This book takes us on a dazzling odyssey into the inner world of animals and among the pioneering researchers who are leading the way into once-forbidden territory: the animal mind.

Call No.: 591.513 MORELL

Auschwitz: a doctor's eyewitness account

by Miklos Nyiszli

When the Nazis invaded Hungary in 1944, they sent virtually the entire Jewish population to Auschwitz. A Jew and a medical doctor, Dr. Miklos Nyiszli was spared from death for a grimmer fate: to perform “scientific research” on his fellow inmates under the supervision of the infamous “Angel of Death”: Dr. Josef Mengele. Nyiszli was named Mengele’s personal research pathologist. Miraculously, he survived to give this terrifying and sobering account.

Call No.: 940.53 NYISZLI

Berlin games: How the nazis stole the Olympic dream

by Guy Walters

"In 1936, Adolf Hitler welcomed the world to Berlin to attend the Olympic Games. It promised to be not only a magnificent sporting event, but also a grand showcase for the rebuilt Germany. No effort was spared to present the Third Reich as the newest global power. But beneath the glittering surface, the Games of the Eleventh Olympiad of the Modern Era came to act as a crucible for the dark political forces that were gathering, foreshadowing the bloody conflict to come. The 1936 Olympics were nothing less than the most political sporting event of the last century -- an epic clash between proponents of barbarism and those of civilization, both of whom tried to use the Games to promote their own values. Berlin Games is the complete history of those fateful two weeks in August. It is a story of the athletes and their accomplishments, an eye-opening account of the Nazi machine's brazen attempt to use the Games as a model of Aryan superiority and fascist efficiency, and a devastating indictment of the manipulative power games of politicians, diplomats, and Olympic officials that would ultimately have profound consequences for the entire world"--P. [4] of cover.

Call No.: 796.48 WALTERS

Broken mirror: Understanding and treating body dysmorphic disorder 

by E. Ashley Rooney

Explores the symptoms and causes of BDD, in which a victim is obsessed with perceived flaws in her appearance, and describes therapies used to treat the disorder.

Call No.: 616.852 PHILLIPS

Camtasia Studio and beyond  

by Stephanie Torta

Including Version 8, this text covers all of the skills for building effective multimedia presentations with screen-captured software based tutorials, video demonstrations, and lectures using the TechSmith products Camtasia (for Windows), Snagit, and Jing (for both Windows and Mac OS). The companion DVD has over 30 video tutorials and projects. The strategy for this text is to introduce concepts from the ground up to include development milestones, planning the presentation based on the targeted audience, story boarding, screen captures, editing and production based on the desired project. The text also covers Snagit to create sophisticated training documents using advanced image editing features and it uses Jing to make fast video presentations that can quickly be loaded on the Web.

Call No.: 006.696 TORTA

Cooked: A natural history of transformation

by Michael Pollan

"In Cooked, Pollan explores the previously uncharted territory of his own kitchen. Here, he discovers the enduring power of the four classical elements--fire, water, air, and earth--to transform the stuff of nature into delicious things to eat and drink. In the course of his journey, he discovers that the cook occupies a special place in the world, standing squarely between nature and culture. Both realms are transformed by cooking, and so, in the process, is the cook."

Call No.: 641.3 POLLAN

The Death class: A true story about life  

by Erika  Hayasaki

When nurse Norma Bowe decided to teach a course on death at a college in New Jersey, she never expected it to be popular. But year after year students crowd into her classroom, and the reason is clear: Norma’s “death class” is really about how to make the most of what poet Mary Oliver famously called our “one wild and precious life.” Under the guise of discussions about last wills and last breaths and visits to cemeteries and crematoriums, Norma teaches her students to find grace in one another. By following her over four years, award-winning journalist Erika Hayasaki shows how Norma steers four extraordinary students from their tormented families and neighborhoods toward happiness.  Through this unorthodox class on death, Norma helps kids who are barely hanging on to understand not only the value of their own lives, but also the secret of fulfillment: to throw yourself into helping others. Hayasaki’s expert reporting and literary prose bring Norma’s wisdom out of the classroom, transforming it into an inspiring lesson for all.

Call No.: 306.9 HAYASAKI

Five days at Memorial: Life and death in a storm-ravaged hospital  

by Sheri Fink

Here the author, a physician and reporter provides a landmark investigation of patient deaths at a New Orleans hospital ravaged by Hurricane Katrina, and a suspenseful portrayal of the quest for truth and justice. She reconstructs 5 days at Memorial Medical Center and draws the reader into the lives of those who struggled mightily to survive and to maintain life amid chaos. After Katrina struck and the floodwaters rose, the power failed, and the heat climbed, exhausted caregivers chose to designate certain patients last for rescue. Months later, several health professionals faced criminal allegations that they deliberately injected patients with drugs to hasten their deaths. She unspools the mystery of what happened in those days, of a hospital fighting for its life and into a conversation about the most terrifying form of health care rationing.

Call No.: 362.169 FINK

The Luminaries : a novel

by Eleanor Catton

This novel is a murder mystery set in a remote gold-mining frontier town in 19th-century New Zealand. Arriving in New Zealand in 1866 a weary Englishman, Walter Moody, lands in a gold-mining frontier town on the coast of New Zealand to make his fortune and forever leave behind his family's shame. On arrival, he stumbles across a tense gathering of twelve local men who have met in secret to investigate what links three crimes that occurred on a single day, events in which each man finds himself implicated in some way. Moody finds himself drawn into a series of unsolved crimes and complex mysteries. Award: Man Booker Prize 2013

Call No.: 823.92 CATTON

The Monuments men: Allied heros, Nazi thieves,and the greatest treasure hunt in history

by Robert M. Edsel

"The previously untold story of a little-known WWII Allied division whose mission was to track down European art and treasures that had been looted by the Nazis at Hitler's command"--Provided by the publisher.

Call No.: 940.531 EDSEL

 

Pandora’s lunchbox: How processed food took over the American meal

by Melanie Warner

From breakfast cereal to frozen pizza to nutrition bars, processed foods are a fundamental part of our diet, accounting for 65% of our nation's yearly calories. Over the past century, technology has transformed the American meal into a chemical-laden smorgasbord of manipulated food products that bear little resemblance to what our grandparents ate. Despite the growing presence of farmers' markets and organic offerings, food additives and chemical preservatives are nearly impossible to avoid, and even the most ostensibly healthy foods contain multisyllabic ingredients with nearly untraceable origins. The far-reaching implications of the industrialization of the food supply that privileges cheap, plentiful, and fast food have been well documented. They are dire. But how did we ever reach the point where 'pink slime' is an acceptable food product? Is anybody regulating what makes it into our food? What, after all, is actually safe to eat? This book blows the lid off the largely undocumented world of processed foods and food manipulation..--Publisher information.

Call No.: 338.47664 WARNER

The Party's over: How the extreme right hijacked the GOP and I became a Democrat

by Charlie Crist

The former Republican governor of Florida reveals how his positive regard for President Obama, concerns about fellow Republicans, and witness to the GOP's transition toward extreme politics prompted his headline-making decision to switch parties.

Call No.: 324.2734 CRIST

Riptide: The new normal for higher education  

by Dan Angel and Terry Connelly

This book reveals and examines the factors contributing to higher education's "fall from grace" in the United States. Drawing on their varied backgrounds in industry, academia and politics, authors Angel and Connelly establish a powerful fact base, sound the alarm for real reform, then lay out a coherent plan to help U.S. higher education regain its preeminence, enabling it to serve all of its constituents in a sustainable cost-effective way.

Call No.: 378.1 ANGEL

 

Schizophrenia: A brother finds answers in biological science

by Ronald Chase

When bright lives are derailed by schizophrenia, bewildered and anxious families struggle to help, and to cope, even as scientists search for causes and treatments that prove elusive. Painful and often misunderstood, schizophrenia profoundly affects people who have the disease and their loved ones. Here Ronald Chase, an accomplished biologist, sets out to discover the facts about the disease and better understand what happened to his older brother, Jim, who developed schizophrenia as a young adult.

Call No.: 616.89 CHASE

The Shark's paintbrush: Biomimicry and how nature is inspiring innovation

by Jay Harman

Award-winning inventor and biomimetic entrepreneur, Jay Harman, introduces us to pioneering engineers in a wide array of businesses who are uncovering and copying nature’s hidden marvels. He shows business leaders and aspiring entrepreneurs how we can reconcile creating more powerful, lucrative technologies with maximizing sustainability. He injects a whole new vocabulary and way of thinking into the business sphere that speaks to both small start-ups and corporate giants.

Call No.: 600 HARMAN

The Son: a novel

by Phillip Meyer

Part epic of Texas, part classic coming-of-age story, part unflinching portrait of the bloody price of power, this is a novel that maps the legacy of violence in the American West through the lives of the McCulloughs, an ambitious family as resilient and dangerous as the land they claim. Spring, 1849. Eli McCullough is thirteen years old when a marauding band of Comanches takes him captive. Brave and clever, Eli quickly adapts to life among the Comanches, learning their ways and waging war against their enemies, including white men, which complicates his sense of loyalty and understanding of who he is. But when disease, starvation, and overwhelming numbers of armed Americans decimate the tribe, Eli finds himself alone. Neither white nor Indian, civilized nor fully wild, he must carve a place for himself in a world in which he does not fully belong, a journey of adventure, tragedy, hardship, grit, and luck that reverberates in the lives of his progeny.

Call No.: 813.6 MEYER

The Teapot dome scandal: How big oil bought the Harding White House and tried to steal the country

by Laton McCartney

This book tells the amazing, complex, and at times ribald story of how Big Oil handpicked Warren G. Harding, an obscure Ohio senator, to serve as our twenty-third president. Harding and his so-called 'oil cabinet' made it possible for the oilmen to secure vast oil reserves that had been set aside for use by the U.S. Navy. In exchange, the oilmen paid off senior government officials, bribed newspaper publishers, and covered the GOP campaign debt. When news of the scandal finally emerged, the consequences were disastrous for the nation and for the principles in the plot to bilk the taxpayers. Stonewalling by members of Harding's circle kept a lid on the story--witnesses developed 'faulty' memories or fled the country, and important documents went missing--but contemporary records newly made available to McCartney reveal a shocking, revelatory picture of just how far-reaching the affair was, how high the stakes, and how powerful the conspirators.--From publisher description.

Call No.: 973.14 McCARTNE

Tweak: (growing up on methamphetamines)  

by Nic Sheff

Sheff relates his personal struggle with drugs and alcohol in this poignant and often disturbing memoir. Paul Michael Garcia is the perfect choice for narrator; his stern and entirely believable voice captures the desolation in Sheff's tale. His reading is wonderfully underplayed, and necessarily so. Garcia becomes Sheff, offering a gritty and raw performance that demonstrates just how dire the circumstances surrounding Sheff's existence really were.

Call No.: 362.29 SHEFF

Walkable city: how downtown can save America, one step at a time

by Jeff Speck

Jeff Speck has dedicated his career to determining what makes cities thrive. And he has boiled it down to one key factor: walkability. Making downtown into a walkable, viable community is the essential fix for the typical American city; it is eminently achievable and its benefits are manifold. Walkable City—bursting with sharp observations and key insights into how urban change happens—presents a plan for American cities that focuses on making downtowns walkable and less attractive to drivers through smart growth and sustainable design, an inspiring vision for how to make American cities great again. A Best Book of the Year according to Planetizen and the American Society of Landscape Architects.

Call No.:  307.12 SPECK