History Course Descriptions

Scheduling requirements and limited resources prevent all courses from being offered every term or every year.  Some courses may be offered exclusively via distance delivery. Course numbers, titles, course and program applicability, prerequisites, instructional format, delivery methods, and content may change without notice.  Students are advised to consult with an advising specialist each term to select courses, create and maintain personal educational plans, and obtain the most current information.


HST 101
HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION

(3.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 3 Credits

Students gain knowledge of the origins and development of civilization from ancient times to the beginnings of Medieval Europe, circa 600 A.D., against the background of Eurasia.

 

HST 102
HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION

(3.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 3 Credits

Students develop an understanding of the cultural, social, economic, and political development of Western civilization from 500 A.D. to 1750 A.D. against the background of Eurasia and the world.

 

HST 103
HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION

(3.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 3 Credits

Students develop an understanding of the cultural, social, economic, and political development of Western civilization from 1750 to the present against the background of Eurasia and the world

 

HST 104
WORLD HISTORY I: ANCIENT AND EARLY MIDDLE AGES

(4.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 4 Credits

Students survey the historical development of world civilizations from antiquity to 1000 C.E. Students explore religious, cultural, social, political, and economic institutions of various societies. Students develop a diverse historical analysis of both ancient Western and non-Western civilizations.

 

HST 105
WORLD HISTORY II: LATE MIDDLE & EARLY MODERN AGES

(4.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 4 Credits

Students survey the historical development of several world civilizations from 1000 to 1750 C.E. Students also explore religious, cultural, social, political, and economic institutions of various

societies. Students develop a diverse historical analysis of the late middle and early modern ages of both Western and non-Western civilizations.

 

HST 106
WORLD HISTORY III: THE MODERN & CONTEMPORARY WORLD

(4.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 4 Credits

Students survey the historical development of several world civilizations from 1750 to the contemporary period. Students also explore religious, cultural, social, political, and economic institutions of various societies. Students develop a diverse historical analysis of modern periods of both Western and non-Western civilizations.

 

HST 201
HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

(3.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 3 Credits

Students develop an understanding of the political, economic, intellectual, and cultural history of the United States from prehistory to 1820.

 

HST 202
HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

(3.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 3 Credits

Students survey the political, social, and cultural history of the United States between 1820and 1898. Emphasis will be placed on the debate and crisis of slavery and abolitionism, expansionism, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the rise of industry and the resort to empire in 1898.

 

HST 203
HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

(3.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 3 Credits

Students survey the political, economic, intellectual, and foreign relations history of the United States during the twentieth century.

 

HST 245
LEWIS & CLARK COURSE OF DISCOVERY

(3.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 3 Credits

Students will begin by following the vision of Thomas Jefferson acquiring the Louisiana Territory. As the expedition proceeds on, Lewis and Clark make preparation by putting together their tools and team. Students follow the expedition across unmapped territory experiencing challenges with weather, geography, natives, and each other. In conclusion, students review the accomplishments and impacts of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

 

HST 277
HISTORY OF THE OREGON TRAIL

(3.00 Lecture Hrs./Wk.) 3 Credits

Students study the explosion of emigration which spread from the United States to the West Coast in the 1800's. More importantly, students look at the motivations of those who emigrated, the various trails, life along the trail, and the impact of emigration.